Thursday, August 12, 2010

Why sadness is as important as happiness - scientifically!

We are always told and taught to take happiness and sadness in the same stride...we should not get too happy when we achieve something or get too sad when we lose...


I read an excerpt from a book on daily Delanceyplace email and found this -  
"The importance of dopamine was discovered by accident. In 1954, James Olds and Peter Milner, two neuroscientists at McGill University, decided to implant an electrode deep into the center of a rat's brain. The precise placement of the electrode was largely happenstance; at the time, the geography of the mind remained a mystery. But Olds and Milner got lucky. They inserted the needle right next to the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a part of the brain that generates pleasurable feelings. Whenever you eat a piece of chocolate cake, or listen to a favorite pop song, or watch your favorite team win the World Series, it is your NAcc that helps you feel so happy.

"But Olds and Milner quickly discovered that too much pleasure can be fatal. They placed the electrodes in several rodents' brains and then ran a small current into each wire, making the NAccs continually excited. The scientists noticed that the rodents lost interest in everything. They stopped eating and drinking. All courtship behavior ceased. The rats would just huddle in the corners of their cages, transfixed by their bliss. Within days, all of the animals had perished. They died of thirst.


Pretty interesting! - huh? 


To read the entire article - please visit Delanceyplace.com dated 12 August 2010 

Sunday, August 08, 2010

Six Graves to Munich - (5/10)


Synposis - In the final days of the Second World War, Michael Rogan, an American intelligence officer, is tortured by a group of seven senior Gestapo officers who need to discover the secrets he alone can give them. Ten years later, when he has recovered from the appalling injuries he suffered, and determined to revenge the death of his wife at the hands of the same men, he begins a quest to track down and kill each one of his tormentors.

**************Spoiler alert!*************

 The book fails to deliver on the hype of man called Mario Puzo - what is completely missing is the signature character building in the book - it is there but is not of the level in Mario's much famous books like "Godfather and Omerta".